Updated 10/16/2019

WORKSHOP GRID

A) Main Space, Violeta Parra Stage

–Ground Floor

B) Michael Ratner Classroom

–Mezzanine

C) Paul Robeson Room

–Lower Level

D) Art Space: Song and Poetry Swaps

–Lower Level

E) Josina Machel Room

–Mezzanine

1st

 Session

10:30am

-

11:45pm

Hear Us Roar: Music in Direct Action

Charon Hribar

Lu Aya

Nueva Cancion:

No Hay Revolución sin Canción

Mario Cancel

Ben Bath

Singing as a Communal Practice

A. Kazimierska

Graziele Sena

Swap:

Songs of Hope, Freedom and Justice

Gary Allard

Mike Glick

Hip Hop Lyricism: Rhythm, Poetry and Rappin’

Jendog Lonewolf

Dilson Hernandez

Professor Louie

2nd

Session 1:15pm

-

2:30pm

NYC Choral Convergence

-Sing in Solidarity
-Walkabout Clearwater Chorus
-Brooklyn Women's Chorus

Panel of Political Hip Hop Artists in NYC

Dilson Hernandez (Moderator);

Jendog Lonewolf;

Brother Northstar

Bomba Music In the Liberation Struggle

Bomba Yo

Swap: Rhythms and Songs of Resistance

Lindsey Wilson + friends

Ukulele for the World

Jenny Selig

Jacob Sayraf

Christine Glave

Angel Martinez


WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

First Workshop: 10:30 AM -12:00 PM

1A) Hear Us Roar: Music in Direct Action 

(Main Space, Violeta Parra Stage - Ground Floor)

Our moment of economic, political, and spiritual crisis presents great potential for the growth of social movements.  People are on the move and ready to take action together across the country and throughout the world.  As in other periods of radical social change, music has played a pivotal role in uniting people across difference, helping to share the message of the people and building collective consciousness. 

This workshop and strategic dialogue is designed to help us build our collective capacity to use music in more effective, sustainable, and inspiring ways for these times.  Responding to the growing actions taking place in our streets, we will strategize together and share our experiences of integrating music and singing in current day protests.  We will talk about "action logic" and how we innovate new ways to use music in the streets and revitalize long standing traditions of participatory singing.  Music can be a powerful tool to build confidence and courage in these challenging times.  Join this conversation about how to transform our movements into spaces of endless creativity and breathtaking beauty.  Because that is what lies within us.

Charon Hribar: Dr. Charon Hribar is the Director of Cultural Strategies at the Kairos Center for Religions, Rights, and Social Justice and Co-Director of Cultural Arts for the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. www.poorpeoplescampaign.org

Lu Aya: Member of The Peace Poets, a NYC-based ensemble making Movement Music that responds to social and political crisis.  They have performed spoken word poetry, and rap in 40 different countries.  Lu is also a trainer with The Wildfire Project where he leads interactive popular pedagogy sessions with frontline grassroots organizations nationally.  http://thepeacepoets.com


1B) Nueva Cancion: No Hay Revolución sin Canción

(Michael Ratner Classroom - Mezzanine Level)                                                            

In this collaborative workshop, we revisit the legacy of nueva canción, the Latin American anti-imperialist musical-poetic movement of the 1960s.  We share classics from Argentina, Chile, Cuba, Nicaragua and Puerto Rico, among other countries, and discuss how they relate to broader topics of social revolution and resistance, while highlighting their relevance to current struggles.  Among the instruments played are the guitar, minor percussion, and the Puerto Rican cuatro – Puerto Rico's national guitar.  We provide copies of the lyrics so that all interested may join in singing.  While the songs are in Spanish, we summarize the main idea of each one in order to make their message accessible to anglophones.  Furthermore, by engaging in interactive practices with the audience, we explain some of the songs' most emblematic musical-lyrical qualities. 

Mario Cancel:  Singer-songwriter and ethnomusicologist. Born in 1982, he learned to play the cuatro at a public music school in San Juan.  He is a Ph.D. candidate in the ethnomusicology program at Columbia University where he researches the relationship between intersubjectivity, creolization, and decoloniality as heard through the song and sound making of politically aware singer-songwriters/musicians/poets who contributed to 1960s and 70s social justice struggles in Puerto Rico and Québec. 

www.facebook.com/mario.cancel.54

Ben Bath: Ethnomusicologist, philosopher and singer who has researched the history of American folk music and the International and American Left.

*Will also include additional musicians and singer-songwriters:  Rubén González, Marco Antonio Castillo, and Jessica Wiscovitch.


1C) Singing as a Communal Practice

(Paul Robeson Screening Room – Lower Level)

Mass media generally portray singing as a product to be enjoyed.  Indeed the beauty and literary content of songs are important and can be tremendously nourishing, but singing can also take other forms and serve other functions.

We invite you to explore singing as a communal practice: Where the quality of the presence of each person in the room influences the quality of our encounter together;  Where a song starts before we start to sing, and continues after we finish; Where each individual is gently invited to individually respond to the momentum and the moment we’re building together through song.

On the notes of the songs, through the vibration of our voices, through singing together, another kind of story is being told. A story that we might be able to touch only in and through each other’s full engagement, participation and presence.

We work mainly with songs from Afro-American and Afro-Hispanic traditions, which have a call-and –response structure and are easy to catch at a first approach.  No former musical preparation is required.

Agnieszka Kazimierska:  Born in Poland, an actress of the international theater company the Open Program of the Workcenter of Jerzy Grotowski and Thomas Richards with which she performs and works with communities in a variety of places around the world.

Graziele Sena:  Born in Brasil, an actress of the international theater company the Open Program of the Workcenter of Jerzy Grotowski and Thomas Richards with which she performs and works with communities in a variety of places around the world.


1D) Song Swap:  Songs of Hope, Freedom and Justice

(Art Space - Lower Level)                                                                                    

We’ll create a supportive circle where participants are invited to share a song, poem, or rap.

Gary Allard: Brooklyn-based singer songwriter.



1E) Hip Hop Lyricism: Rhythm, Poetry and Rappin’

(Josina Machel Room - Mezzanine Level)

How can the artist use Hip Hop's vibrant cultural history to offer the gift of resilient power and dignity?   In this workshop, panelists will discuss how they write in a hip-hop style.  They will share examples of their own writing and encourage participants to reflect on how their writing can serve as a vehicle for resistance.

Jendog covers the elements of hip hop and facilitates participants in writing their own Hip Hop bars, inviting even the most shy and new to Hip Hop, to joyfully learn to rap (aka "spit bars").  Professor Louie will discuss spoken word as a tool of political consciousness.

Jendog Lonewolf:  Brooklyn-born Hip Hop MC, Two Spirit Black Native, Photographer, and multi-disciplinary, international touring Artist.  She performs and facilitates workshops at colleges/universities and national conferences as one half of Hip Hop/Storytelling performance duo, Brooklyn Dreamwolf, with YaliniDream.  She challenges stereotypes & contends with a myriad of experiences at the intersections of class/race/ gender/sexuality.  She collaborated with Grammy®-winner, Dan Zanes on two Folk-Hip Hop remixes, including one for Smithsonian Folkways Records, and she received a citation of honor from the City of Brooklyn.

Professor Louie: The “Poet of the Streets” has performed at more rallies, benefits, street fairs, meetings, and demonstrations than he, or anyone else, can remember.

Second Workshop: 1:15 PM - 2:45 PM

2A) NYC Choral Convergence

(Main Space, Violeta Parra Stage - Ground Floor)

Comrades, get ready to raise your voices together!  NYC is home to a number of spirited activist choirs.  This workshop is an opportunity for organizers and singers to come together, talk about their experiences contributing choral music to the movement, and learn some great songs.  Each choir will take turns teaching a song from their own repertoire to the full group, thus amplifying each choir’s vocal power more than four-fold!  This workshop is open to everyone, choir member or not.

Participating Choirs:

Sing in Solidarity:  Members use their voices to strengthen the socialist community through song. The chorus has additionally fundraised for organizations supporting the migrant caravans and anti-racist actions.  Begun in 2017 by members of the Democratic Socialists of America, the chorus draws its repertoire from the rich tradition of international revolutionary song.  Its mission is to disseminate anti-capitalist music, build internationalism, and unite the struggles of working and oppressed peoples.  https://www.facebook.com/SingSolidarity/

Walkabout Clearwater Chorus:  Habeen quite successful in getting others to sing with us at many demonstrations including the The Women's Marches, The People's Climate March, a Black Lives Matter march in New Rochelle, and many others.

http://walkaboutchorus.org/music/home.php

Brooklyn Women's Chorus: a community chorus formed in October 1997 by Park Slope resident and musician, Bev Grant. Their repertoire ranges from South African freedom songs to socially relevant songs by contemporary songwriters like Garth Brooks, Jackson Browne, Pat Humphries, and Bev Grant herself.  Topics range from freedom and justice, to peace, resistance, and women’s labor history.  http://www.brooklynwomenschorus.com/


*** We’re using the convergence as a networking opportunity to facilitate networking among our choirs.  Please consider joining us at our lunch discussion table immediately before this session.  Each choir will also have a chance to hear each other perform at the open mic later in this afternoon.


2B) Panel of Political Hip Hop Artists in NYC

(Michael Ratner Classroom - Mezzanine Level)      

Hip Hop is a genre that was birthed and molded by poverty and systemic oppression in the Bronx. Due to its history, it’s no surprise that those same oppressive attributes started appearing in the music, both in empowering and destructive ways. 

This panel will touch on the positive and negative effects that Hip Hop culture has imposed on Black and Latinx communities, from the inception of the genre to the commercialization of its culture.  Panelists will discuss how Hip Hop impacted communities from a musical and sociological perspective. 

We will close out the panel with a "cypher", which will incorporate improvisational music and singing from the audience, that matches the improvisational rapping by the panelists and audience volunteers. 

Dilson Hernandez (Moderator)Dilson is a genre-merging artist from the Bronx.  Besides playing several instruments, his talents include creative writing, spoken-word poetry, singing, audio engineering, and beat making.  He also became a certified Audio Engineer from the Institute of Audio Research.  Dilson wishes to change the world with his art and community work (mostly for youth), aiming to strive for a more progressive and creative future.

www.dilsonmusic.com

Jendog Lonewolf:  Brooklyn-born Hip Hop MC, Two Spirit Black Native, Photographer, and multi-disciplinary, international touring Artist.  She performs and facilitates workshops at colleges/universities and national conferences as one half of Hip Hop/Storytelling performance duo, Brooklyn Dreamwolf, with YaliniDream.  She challenges stereotypes & contends with a myriad of experiences at the intersections of class/race/ gender/sexuality.  She collaborated with Grammy®-winner, Dan Zanes on two Folk-Hip Hop remixes, including one for Smithsonian Folkways Records, and she received a citation of honor from the City of Brooklyn.


Brother Northstar



2C) Bomba Music In the Liberation Struggle

(Paul Robeson Screening Room – Lower Level

DESCRIPTION IS COMING SOON!

Bomba Yo:

http://www.bombayo.org/


2D) Song Swap: Rhythms and Songs of Resistance

(Art Space - Lower Level)                       

We’ll create a supportive circle where participants are invited to share a song, poem, or rap.

Lindsey Wilson:  Singer/songwriter who embraces issues of the heart and mind in her original music. She writes love songs, protest tunes, and lyrics of empowerment. www.facebook.com/LindseyWilsonLive



2E) Ukulele for the World

(Josina Machel Room - Mezzanine Level)     

            The ukulele is a worldwide musical instrument; it’s sounds can be heard from folk to punk to Jazz. It is fun, versatile, and perfect for beginning musicians, small gatherings and large protests.

            How can a portable four-string be part of the struggles for freedom and justice? How can it express solidarity? Bring your uke and be prepared to learn!  Need a uke? Many libraries have them to loan and offer affordable lessons!

            Join our jam and meet members of local uke groups to expand your repertoire and make musical connections that will help you “Uke-on”!

Jenny Selig: teaches ukulele online in NYC, starting the NYC Uke Squad linked to ukulele sensation Cynthia Lin. Jenny moved to N Brooklyn from the Midwest, residing with 2cats, her artist husband, and one extremely cool kid. She juggles her ukulele playing with her teaching/doula career and works in audio books. Find her via Newukenewyork.com

Jacob Sayraf-aka-“Ukulele Jake”: teacher, performer, jingle writer-settled in NYC 5 years ago after a tour of the US and Europe. Founder of the Ukulele school of New York City-his teaching model illustrates learning complex music theory with ease with focusing on a musicians vision and goals!

Christine Glave: Organizing Committee member, uke player.

Angel Martinez: Organizing Committee member, poet.


© 2017 People's Music Network for Songs of Freedom and Struggle.
People's Music Network is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. c/o Sally Campbell 252 W 91st St Apt 64, New York, NY 10024-1135

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